From Gary: We are finally leaving Winnemucca.

Suni & Courage Travel Quarters

Suni & Courage Travel Quarters


Gary driving

Gary driving

Hot afternoon in Winnemucca!

Got the new starter installed yesterday, and hooked up this morning, also replaced the engine mounted solenoid and starter switch. Evidently the starter switch and/or solenoids can stick and cause the starter to not stop running…

It took me about 6 hours to R&R starters, tech manuals warned against trying it alone. It weighs 50 pounds, and is in a tough spot to put it in, and serious injury can result if not done with two soldiers…

I ended up using a rope sling and pry bar across the top of the engine, accomplished it by myself, but it was most definitely hard to do… scraped up arms to the arm pits, covered in grease, and hotter than I liked at over 80 degrees while doing the job..

But now can strongly recommend that those with M-35’s at least carry a spare starter, engine mount solenoid and dash switch…

Symptoms were the amp gauge acting erratically after start up, this was the starter continuing to run, but couldn’t hear it over the engine noise, this chewed up the starter pinion gear, back to where it no longer engaged…

Am also thinking about the trailer brake burn out problem, and that I should build a surge brake system when I extend trailer tongue…

Might not be Milspec, but would simplify the system from the stock air over hydraulics, and be a good upgrade…

Anyway, test started the truck, everything OK, so we will be back on the road in the morning heading for Salt Lake via I-80, to have better engineered roads for more gradual passes, and truck lanes and even apron to run on, as on 7% grades and the heavy load I’m often down to second gear high range, and 10 mph…

We have more passes on the secondary road system around Grand Canyon, and I’m thinking to maybe do them in low range with the front axle locked in if they are steep, to increase safety and gear choices at low speeds required…

So far it has been an exceptional experience, and I’m learning quite a lot the hard way…

I consider this trip to be a trial run for those planning on using their M-35’s as bug out vehicles…. What I learn and share could save lives when the Shinola hits the fan…

I also got an idea to maybe build a spare fuel tank and tool box combination under the back of the truck frame..

One problem we have had is access to tools for breakdowns… Have had to unload too much stuff and relocate tools to more accessible places… and having another fuel tank would be a good idea…

Surprisingly I think we are still getting a near 10 mpg average in spite of slow speeds and climbs… the stock tank is 50 gallons, we filled it in Lakeview, Oregon, and made it to Winnemucca, Nevada via the bad roads and tank is still just under half full…

I think I could build a 25 gallon or more tank under aft of truck, and still have room for a decently large tool box behind it….

Or one could hang another stock 50 gallon M-35 tank back there.. something to consider guys, in bug out situations, what fuel you start out with may be all you get the easy way… and having a thousand mile range would be a good idea…

I see bug out as in reality a refugee situation.  If the cause is nuclear war, there will likely be nuclear power plants melting down, and your only real choices are mutate or migrate… and migrate as far south as you can…

Personally I think people are silly when their bug out logic imagines everything will be patched up in 72 hours or six months…

Even worse is thinking that you can bug out in place…

The logical equivalent of moving to Chernobyl for cheap rent…

I tend to believe the 1968 prophecy by the 90 year old woman, search it…

And that one had best be prepared to get kit and caboodle as far south as possible…at least mid Mexico… meaning at least 2500 miles for the average American…

For me its easier bugging out earlier, not coming back… so I get to do it while gas stations still exist, and Banana Republic governments think we are some form of crazy Gringo tourists…

The Latins haven’t been treated all that nicely, and I suspect that when the crash happens they may decide its a prime opportunity to abuse American refugees… perhaps lighten your load, and off with your daughters and wives…

And with wind patterns being what they are, and military targets like San Diego, and other nuke plants in California, other military bases etc. I doubt even northern Mexico would be a good final destination of choice…

I’d prefer to be much farther south and long embedded with indigenous people who are still agrarian…

And have a history of being decent, and a valued member of a community…

Anyway, these last few days are my first experience in an RV park…

And looking at it from a Prepper perspective, I think the vast majority are way too dependent on hookups… Talked to one woman whose camper didn’t come with a water tank… she has to have hookups…

She also had a flat tire and no jack..

I’d say the vast majority of the RVer types are techno-cult dependent.. on retirement checks, and grid power etc…

I suggest that any who are serious Preppers not be this way…

Most of the American southwest is a vast desert, and power grid and reservoirs are obvious military targets… as are fuel supplies…

I doubt the average RV bug out types would last long… personally I like to think from the bottom up… be able to go on foot, and survive if necessary… and we also have solar panels etc. for if we can stay with our truck…

As I write, the situation in Ukraine isn’t getting any better.. And its quite possible it or something similar could lead up to WW3…

I hope to hell not, but if nothing else its a good practice run..

And those denial heads doing nothing appear to be potentially non survivable genetics…

I think there’s a spectrum of denial that includes most Preppers.. If you aren’t prepared for the worst, you aren’t really prepared….

Anyway, we will be leaving early in the morning to travel as much as possible while its still cool… I have seen that we got 250 plus miles even on our day with breakdowns… this was my estimated daily distance… I suspect 300 would be realistic on a good day..and know I have done near 500 miles in about 12 hours, but that was without the load, and flat interstate highways…

Another thing I’ve learned is that you’d better not load your M-35 up too heavy for a bug out situation… I would try to keep it down to just essentials for survival and starting a new life as a permanent refugee… This means tools to recreate a livelihood have much higher priority than household baggage…Don’t be leveraged by the woman into taking as much as possible!

I’d suggest you have a tool set that included the ability to boot up some kind of cottage industry,  and very important would be agricultural hand tools…

My personal choice for a single best agricultural tool is the heavy hoes used by fire fighters, sometimes known as hazel hoes or grub hoes… these can be bought at forestry supply places, and should be sharpened..

My other top choices are things like a sewing machines, and bicycles…

On sewing machines we chose Singer 237’s, which are heavy duty and have zig zag, very popular with the Amish, to put on treadle bottoms, they were made up until 1960, and can be found online from $50 to $400 depending on condition, and you can still get every part for them… also a good stock of appropriate sewing machine needles and heavy nylon threads in bulk…

Food, shelter, and “clothing”…..

I think the necessity most unmentioned is tools…. without tools you will be at the mercy of cultural dependency…

Anyway, I hope I have helped some people I will never meet… Not doing this for the money… But if you feel this expedition is worthy, and wish to donate any amount, please do so, any amount will be appreciated, and I intend to give those who have donated, priority in personal communications… For instance, those with questions or who wish help setting up in Central America… I’ve lived there for 18 years, at least half that time as the only American in my village, and lived very low, so I know exactly how to do it on half a shoe string…

I also was the only American to continually ride the “Chicken Busses” etc.. so I know more than most about the local culture..

I also cooked that entire 18 years on open fires… so that and other similar experiences, makes me a better teacher than the weekend warriors or two year experts in living in the third world…

I love to learn, teach, and help!

But please also consider paying forward in some small way… I didn’t learn anything the easy way…

G

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